Our SEN children are being punished in school for their own disabilities….If I am lying I’m dying

A storm is coming….Hell firestorm is brewing

Parents/carers of children and young people with SEN, especially undiagnosed SEN, live a daily battle from what I can tell.

Not only do parents/carers have to support and nurture the needs of the SEN child they also have to enter into many different battles with the world outside.

And I have had enough.

Below is a link for you to view to read the statistics for permanent exclusions and suspensions in England for 2019/20. There is a lot of information when reading “pupil characteristics” for those excluded or receiving suspensions such as Higher rates for those receiving free school meals and ethnicity (Gypsy/Roma pupils continue to have the highest rates of permanent exclusions (0.23) and suspensions (15.28). Pupils of mixed White and Black Caribbean ethnicity have the second-highest rate of permanent exclusion (0.15).

But right now, I am addressing SEN, and this is what it says:

Rates are higher among pupils with special education needs (SEN)

The permanent exclusion rate for pupils with an education, health, and care (EHC) plan is 0.10, and for pupils with SEN with no EHC plan (SEN support) is 0.20, compared to 0.04 for those without SEN.

The suspension rate is also higher: 11.70 for EHC pupils and 10.98 for SEN support pupils, compared to 2.43 for those without SEN.

The highest rates are amongst those with a primary type of need recorded as social, emotional, and mental health, at 0.61 for exclusions and 33.04 for suspensions. This is in line with previous years.

But wait ….there is more

The most common reason for permanent exclusion was persistent disruptive behaviour

The proportion of permanent exclusions due to each reason have remained broadly similar despite decreasing numbers.

Just over a third (34%) of all permanent exclusions were for persistent disruptive behaviour in 2019/20, similar to 2018/19 (35%). This equates to 1,700 permanent exclusions in 2019/20, down from 2,800 in 2018/19, showing the impact of school closures.

https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england

So let me get this right….if I am wrong then please tell me….

But this is what I can see….

The most common reason for permanent exclusion and suspensions is persistent disruptive behaviour…What exactly does that mean?

Are we talking…

  • Self-focused behaviour, not paying close attention to details, listening to others, or making careless mistakes.
  • Finds it difficult to stay focused on tasks or activities.
  • Does not follow through on instructions or complete classwork on time.
  • Has problems organising tasks and work.
  • Avoids or dislikes tasks that require extended mental effort.
  • Often loses things needed for tasks or daily life, such as school equipment, books, glasses, etc.
  • Is easily distracted and often appears to be daydreaming during lessons.
  • Forgets daily tasks, such as doing chores or routine errands.
  • Fidgetiness.  For example, fidgets with or taps hands or feet, or squirms in seat.
  • Not able to stay seated in classroom for even short periods without walking around.
  • Unable to play or do leisure activities quietly.
  • Talks too much.
  • Blurts out answers before the teacher has finished asking a question.
  • Finds it difficult to wait his or her turn.
  • Interrupts or intrudes on others (for instance, cuts into conversations, games, or activities, or starts using other students’ things without permission).
  • Frequent loss of temper
  • Frequently arguing with adults and/ or actively defying rules and requests from authority figures.
  • Deliberately seeking to irritate others
  • Blaming others
  • Being overly sensitive
  • Heightened anger or resentment towards others
  • Spiteful or vindictive conduct
  • Swearing frequently

If the answer is yes, these are the kinds of behaviours you are referring to in terms of persistent disruptive behaviour then…OK … I get it

It must be very frustrating. I can see why you would become angry and annoyed. I can see why you would want to get rid of the “issues” to make learning easier. Having to deal with this day after day must be draining, you are just one person and having all of this going on can be too much at times. I get it. I also understand that there may be times that you take this out on the wrong person.

You are trying to navigate your way through school, through lessons and you have to deal with all this….It’s too heavy for one person to carry.

For you….the child or young person.

I feel the frustration for them. That’s where my understanding and support lay. With the child and young person. It starts and finishes with them

Because we are big grown people out here. We, the adults, we need to learn to cope and adjust. We need to create safe spaces for our children to receive and suction whilst living with SEND

Because the list above for “Persistent disruptive behaviour” are all behaviours that may be displayed if a child is living with Autism, ADD, ADHD, Asperger’s and ODD

Let us now address the SEN aspect

The permanent exclusion rate for pupils with an education, health, and care (EHC) plan is 0.10, and for pupils with SEN with no EHC plan (SEN support) is 0.20, compared to 0.04 for those without SEN.

So even with a EHCP, even with an actual diagnosis and plan, for an actual disability….a child can still be permanently excluded AND there is a good chance it can be for “Persistent disruptive behaviour”

Worst still

If you have no EHCP but you do have SEN, 0.20 children are permanently excluded from school compared to 0.04 for Theos without SEN.

How… how on earth are we allowing this. A Children is trying to navigate the school system, that was not created in any way to meet their needs. Trying to navigate everything that goes with schools such as social fields, sensory issues, and mental health….and they are still being excluded and most like for….yes…you guessed it…” persistent disruptive behaviour”

And then

My personal favourite (Insert chef kiss here as you read)

The highest rates are amongst those with a primary type of need recorded as social, emotional, and mental health, at 0.61 for exclusions and 33.04 for suspensions.

On top of all that….we are punishing those who most likely have suffered trauma.

It’s just disgusting

And I have had it

Let me tell you where I am and then you can decide where you are and then we can move forward together …or not…

  • No child should be punished for their own disability
  • Schools making “reasonable adjustments” need to be very clear on what that looks like
  • If schools say they offer SEN provision and get additional fusing for this, then those with SEN should be the least likely to be receiving  exclusions…due to the wrap around care they should be receiving…because of the funding….you see where I am with this
  • Its all well and good looking at permanent  exclusions and suspensions. But what about all the children receiving detentions day after day or being pushed on a low-level basis within school because of their needs…or…as I like to see it…the school not meeting their needs

I mean….for example, purposes only…claiming a reasonable adjustment for a diagnosed SEN child is not sanctioning them for walking the wrong way down a corridor is….well….insulting.

So, I have had enough. I storm is coming people. And you know me…if you have followed me over the past few years…every single storm I have entered on this level I come out stronger and with change in place.

So, let’s get something going. Let’s hold schools accountable. Let’s make noise…

Because by these statistics…if you are a non-white male with SEN then you need as many people as you can in your corner.

I feel a campaign coming on…

I feel a storm brewing

So, who’s with me?

You can read the report here:

https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/permanent-and-fixed-period-exclusions-in-england

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